IndieDev Programmer

I’ve never seen myself as a programmer.  My friend I grew up with was and is very good at it.

I see it more as a part of the big picture of making something, and not something that I could get into in and of itself.

I only want my skill level to climb to the level of familiarity, rather than mastery.

Gold Tier (None so Far)

Items in this tier wowed me.

Purple Tier

Items in this tier provided me supreme value for the cost and time invested

  • Unity Documentation – Free – Pretty much this is how you program.  Look something up, and try and try again to use the tutorials someone else does into you can understand it.  There’s an example for every function in the documentation.  Start reading
  • Microsoft C# Code – Free – I use C# in Unity, and this helps solve my questions for what other functions there are.
  • High School C++ Class – Free – I took a class in programming C++.  I was good, but I wanted to be an engineer at the time so I didn’t pursue it.  It actually helped me out recently as I’ve read been reading some C++ code for tips in my Unity C# code.
  • Google – Free – If I don’t know what to do for a specific programming problem, then I look it up in Google, get an idea, and then go back to trying to make it work.

Blue Tier

Items in this tier provided me a good amount of value for the cost and time invested

  • Unity 3D UI Essentials – $40 – Pretty much this is how you program.  Look something up, and try and try again to use the tutorials someone else does into you can understand it.  There’s an example for every function in the documentation.  Start reading
  • Flixel Tutorials – Free – Before my second deployment, I did a few walkthroughs. With the pixel art, and the ability to play the game afterwards, the seeds of being an IndieDev planted themselves into my mind.

Green Tier

Items in this tier provided me some value for the cost and time invested

  • Game Development with Unity Book – $25 – This little robot game got me started with Unity, and ultimately sold me on it.  I went through the whole book.
  • Unity 3.x Game Development Essentials – $50 – This campfire styled game felt easier because of the book above.  Concepts started to be cemented, and I felt more comfortable with Unity.  This marked the end of reading books for programming.
  • Cat Like Coding Runner Tutorial – Free – This helped me to understand Events better in programming.
  • Code Academy – Free – I needed to brush up on some internet programming skills.  This helped me to understand it better.
  • Fundamentals of Physics Book – $120 – I used projectile motion for an endless runner.  Going back to this book I got in College (and AP Physics in High School) helped me to figure out some equations.
  • Agile Software Development Book – $55 – A bit complicated for me with some of the programming designs, but very helpful for understanding Agile development.

White Tier

Items in this tier provided me little to no value for the cost and time invested

  • West Point IT Course – Years Active Duty Service – mandatory course in IT every cadet must take.  The training was so shallow and wide, that you didn’t really learn a whole lot.

Grey Tier (None So Far)

Items in this tier felt like value was taken away from me for the cost and time invested

Continuing Education

I’m not really focused on getting formal education for programming.

I just look at it as something to pick up along the way to get whatever project done I need to get done.

I don’t think I need formal training either, as my strengths lie in logic (hence the degree in Engineering).

I’ll post anything else in the future that’s helped me considerably, but I don’t see myself devouring books or any much else in the future.

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Disclaimer

In the interest of transparency, many of the links are affiliate links.  Some things I’ve read aren’t the strongest books out there, so I’ve left those out so you don’t have to waste your time or money on them like I did.