The Moral Relativity of Presidents Eisenhower and Clinton

As I continue in my informal education of politics, I read a recommended book titled “White Guilt“.


(As a note, it’s written by a black man)

The book explained the struggles between my grandparent’s and parent’s generations (“greatest” and “baby boomer”).

Not only did it explain their struggles, but it helped understand how their actions continue to affect my generation (“millennial?”).

The book starts off that the media heard a rumor that President Eisenhower (Ike) occasionally used the “n” word amongst friends on the golf course.  (As a grad of West Point, we aren’t taught that about Ike, who was also a West Point graduate).

How is it then that Ike’s presidency survived something that would get him kicked out of the presidency today, and President Bill Clinton’s presidency survived something that would get him kicked out of presidency in Ike’s age?

The answer lies in the moral relativity of each era’s American morals.

How did these values change so significantly over one generation? If sexual sin was one of the “greatest of all” sins back then, what is the “greatest of all” sins for the era we’re living in now?  Why did the change occur?

We’ll get into what the author says in my next post.

It’s a lot.